Thursday, July 05, 2012

Maliki is so full of himself

On the road from Fallujah to Baghdad, security checkpoints feature large posters of #Iraq PM Nuri al-Maliki (via Prashant Rao, AFP Baghdad bureau chief)

27 comments:

Anonymous said...

The American people have spoken

Marcus said...

I wonder if Maliki will ever raise a large installatiion portraying his own hands holding two huge crossed swords over a major highway. Or wwould that be just too blatant?

Petes said...

He needs to grow a bigger moustache, Marcus.

Lynnette In Minnesota said...

*shrug*

It wasn't for Saddam.

Lynnette In Minnesota said...

He needs to grow a bigger moustache, Marcus.

lol!

Zeyad said...

I had a bigger moustache than Saddam. Where's my monument???

Lynnette In Minnesota said...

Hmmm...well, I don't know about a monument, but stay here long enough, grow it back, and we could nominate you for an award. :)

Lynnette In Minnesota said...

Btw, don't do that. You look better without it. :)

Zeyad said...

You should have seen me with a beard two months ago. I scared everyone at the hospital, lol.

Lynnette In Minnesota said...

Aha!

Wild man of the Middle East, eh? :)

I don't know what the attraction is to mustaches and beards. Other than not having to shave, of course.

Ah well, I'm off for the night. I was one of those unfortunate people who had to work today.

Have a nice night. :)

   Lee C.  ―   U.S.A.     said...

   
Re:  American politics:

Romney's campaign raised a record $100 million in June; that's a record month for any Republican presidential candidate, ever (although Obama beat that feat once in the 2008 campaign, he's not come anywhere close to it this year).
And, the monthly jobs report was for only around 80,000 new jobs picked up in June; below bare minimum maintenance levels..
All this should come as welcome news to Romney, who was otherwise having a pretty miserable week.

Lynnette In Minnesota said...

Something has changed. The page seems to pull up a little quicker and the background color is white.

Hmmm...?

   Lee C.  ―   U.S.A.     said...

 
I'm still getting the grey with a reddish tint in it.  It does seem that the initial load is faster though.

Lynnette In Minnesota said...

Mexicans in my neighborhood celebrating 4th of July. If that isn't weird then I don't know what is. Zeyad's Twitter feed

Everybody likes a party and a day off. :)

Lynnette In Minnesota said...

Maybe Zeyad is playing around with his blog settings.

   Lee C.  ―   U.S.A.     said...

 
      "If that isn't weird then I don't know what is."

I don't find it at all weird.  We even have a word for it; t's called ‘assimilation’.

   Lee C.  ―   U.S.A.     said...

 
Call it ‘adequate integration’ for politically correct Swedes.

Lynnette In Minnesota said...

Assimilation or "adequate integration" doesn't happen overnight. Someday maybe Zeyad will look at things differently. Right now he's got a lot of emotional turmoil to deal with.

Zeyad said...

To me, being American is a bit more than just playing with fireworks on 4th of July.

   Lee C.  ―   U.S.A.     said...

 
      "To me, being American is a bit more than just
      playing with fireworks on 4th of July.
"

Yes, of course, but that didn't seem to be the thrust of your tweet.  In the case of Mexicans, they have an equivalent ‘Independence Day’ for Mexico, Cinco de Mayo, 5th of May.  It commemorates the Mexican uprising against Napoleanic France, which had taken over Mexico after defeating Spain in Europe.  Both days commemorate Americans throwing off European control.  So, there's no reason we can't celebrate both, they're entirely compatible.  So, Mexicans, in the U.S.A., can participate in 4th of July celebrations, they're entirely compatible with a Mexican heritage.  And, they can feel, and look to their gringo neighbors to be, just a little more ‘American’, without being to be any less ‘Mexican’.  It's something we can share.  Traditionally, both the 4th of July and Thanksgiving have been holidays immigrants can share in equally with the native born.  Helps to develop the sense of a shared common identity, in spite of maintaining some continuing cultural differences.

   Lee C.  ―   U.S.A.     said...

 
Post Script:

I have shared in Cinco de Mayo celebrations with Mexican friends, and friends who are citizens and of Mexican heritage.  It's something we can agree upon; it's good to be free.  It's good if your neighbors are free.  (I've even been known to fish for an invitation from some whom I thought might be shy about inviting a gringo.  As Lynnette mentioned, everybody enjoys a good party.)

Lynnette In Minnesota said...

To me, being American is a bit more than just playing with fireworks on 4th of July.

I'm glad.

I have always felt that being American has far more to do with the ideals this country was based on, rather than by geographic location, religion, color of skin, etc.

I think it is that which many native born Americans tend to forget and may need newly minted Americans to remind them of.

As to playing around with fireworks, well, everyone has their own way of celebrating America's existence. As long as they don't shoot off their foot I'm good with that. :)

Lynnette In Minnesota said...

Lee mentioned John Adams in the other thread. If you have never read David McCullough's biography of him I recommend it highly. I rather think this is what he would have said in regard to this post:

Government is nothing more than the combined force of society, or the united power of the multitude, for the peace, order, safety, good and happiness of the people...There is no king or queen bee distinquished from all others, by size or figure or beauty and variety of colors, in the human hive. No man has yet produced any revelation from heaven in his favor, any divine communication to govern his fellow men. Nature throws us all into the world equal and alike...

   Lee C.  ―   U.S.A.     said...

 
      "Government is nothing more than the combined
      force of society, or the united power of the multitude,
      for the peace, order, safety, good and happiness of
      the people...
"

I've slowly become convinced over the last few years that most people in the Muslim Middle East, from Morocco to Pakistan, view the purpose of government to be something other than the promotion of 'peace, order, safety, good and happiness of the people".  Certainly most people in government anyway.

Bridget said...

Don't forget Juneteenth!

Shatha said...

please read...

our iraqi government is not doing any work except for our prime minister's work and his supporters so if there should be posters around the city they should be of this great man and besides he didn't ask for these posters to be put up !!

lots of people put them out of love and respect for him!

Musa Kocaman said...

Kendi Çektiğiniz Fotoğrafları paylaşabilirsiniz.