Tuesday, July 10, 2012

Banner from Qatif

Shi'ite protesters in the eastern region hold a banner during the funerals of the protesters shot by Saudi riot police. It reads: "This is the Republic of al-Ahsa and al-Qatif. No to the kingdom of Wahhabis and Al Saud."



***

A child from Syria holding a sign: "As long as you respect my rights you are my brother. It doesn't matter if you worship God or a stone ~ from free Yebrud 7-10-12"

24 comments:

Lynnette In Minnesota said...

Zeyad,

Have you managed to retrieve your furniture and books?

Lynnette In Minnesota said...

"As long as you respect my rights you are my brother. It doesn't matter if you worship God or a stone ~ from free Yebrud 7-10-12"

I like this one the best. :)

   Lee C.  ―   U.S.A.     said...

 
      "This is the Republic of al-Ahsa and al-Qatif."

An expression of intent for secession.  Not likely that's gonna go over well with the authorities.  That hardly ever goes over well, even if the authorities aren't Wahabi.  But, it brings back a thought to my head.
It's likely the seeds of much of the current unrest in the Middle East can be traced straight back to the breakup of the Ottoman Empire.  There wasn't much in the way of nation/state in most of the Arab part of that empire, neither before nor especially during the Ottoman Turk rule.
The locals like to pretend that the current fairly unnatural borders are the fault of the Europeans.  And, I don't dispute the idea that the Europeans often did a fairly poor job of laying out national borders for the new nations they husbanded into existence (and probably had way too few ‘nations’ on their maps to boot).  However, it's highly unlikely the locals could have done a better job.  They had no history for it.  So, they were gonna fight over this eventually.  With the breakdown of the Cold War and the loss of patronage from the Cold War superpowers and their coalitions, the locals have finally turned to having some of the nationhood and border fights they were inevitably gonna have at some point anyway.  And, it may well be that some of the European ‘meddling’ actually prevented even further bloodshed than would have occurred without said ‘meddling’.  In fact, I think that's very likely true.  Al least some of the European drawn borders seem likely to endure without significant challenge.

Petes said...

Seems to me the troll's fits of ignorant condescension are increasing in frequency of late.

   Lee C.  ―   U.S.A.     said...

 
That 3:07 AM posting could probably be accurately characterized as a ‘drive-by’ pomposity, not entirely random, but with no apparent point other than the pomposity itself.

Petes said...

Oil took another one per cent slide this morning, and that in spite of the fact that the dollar has strengthened against the euro and other currencies.

Petes said...

Iraq's oil revenue for June was down $2.4b compared to April, due to falling prices and rising domestic consumption. It exported 100 kbpd less in June, although oil production is still at its highest level for twenty years. The Iraqi economy will be impacted if prices continue to slide -- 98% of government revenue is from oil.

   Lee C.  ―   U.S.A.     said...

 
Today's entry re: American politics

It would seem that Obama took a hit among independents in the immediate aftermath of the disappoint jobs report for the month of June.  But, it seems that may have been short lived.  More recent polls show Obama creeping back up as against Romney, at least in the swing states where it really counts (and not just the self-serving ‘Priorities USA’ poll, which I'd have to label as potentially suspect).

   Lee C.  ―   U.S.A.     said...

 
The Russians appear to be trying again to get some of their marines and assault vehicles to their base in Tartus, Syria.  Foreign Policy

Lynnette In Minnesota said...

Interesting article, Lee. The Russians appear to have some critical choices to make.

If Syrian opposition forces wanted to attack Russian targets in Syria, they would not need to wait for the arrival of these marines in Tartus. There are plenty of Russians present in Syria even now -- including those already at the naval base. Up to now, though, the Syrian opposition has not focused on them.

My guess is the Syrian opposition has other fish to fry right now.

Lynnette In Minnesota said...

Zeyad,

If you're out there and listening, albeit not speaking, I wanted to tell you that I was starting to get a little irritated with you on this book recommendation. I was finding Mahfouz's characters in "Palace of Desire" rather rigid and closed minded in their thinking, not really likable at all. But I am almost done with it now and have begun to think that Kamal is not just a lovestruck teenager but someone of substance. He appears to have the ability to think for himself. I suspect perhaps a bit of an autobiographical character? So, if he isn't killed off, I will forgive you.

   Lee C.  ―   U.S.A.     said...

 
      " The Russians appear to have some critical
      choices to make.
"

I believe they've already made most of their choices.  Now we wait and see how far they're willing to push it (developments on the ground will have an impact on that), and how well their choices work out for them in the end.

Zeyad said...

Lynnette, Kamal is my favorite character in the series and he is indeed a reflection of the author's own spiritual journey in life. (spoiler alert) don't worry he won't be killed off.

Petes said...

LOL. That spoiler alert didn't leave much time to avert one's eyes.

Petes said...

The Syrian ambassador to Baghdad has defected to the Syrian rebel cause.

Petes said...

Good news, or at least some belated justice ... the unscrupulous f*cker who sold $85m of completely useless bomb detector equipment to Iraq has been charged with fraud. A BBC investigation in 2010 revealed that the devices, which were sold at $40k a twist, contained absolutely no functional components. Sales were banned by the UK government, but some of these things are still in use at police checkpoints in Iraq. The owner of the manufacturing company, Jim McCormack has been charged with six counts of fraud. I wonder how many Iraqis died because of this gangster.

Wholesale Printer said...

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Lynnette In Minnesota said...

...don't worry he won't be killed off.

Thank you for the reassurance. :)

Lynnette In Minnesota said...

U.K. bank Barclays agreed to pay $453 million to settle claims brought by U.S. and U.K. bank regulators.

Possibly only the tip of that iceberg. As someone mentioned in the comments section, it will be interesting to see if they eventually bring criminal charges against some of these people.

Regulators OK key Dodd-Frank rules.

Is it enough?

   Lee C.  ―   U.S.A.     said...

 
      "s it enough?"

Oh hell no!  If the banks are too big to fail, they're too damn big.

   Lee C.  ―   U.S.A.     said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
   Lee C.  ―   U.S.A.     said...

 
Today's entry re:  American politics

Rumors abounding today that Mitt Romney was acting as CEO of Bain Capital for three years longer than he has admitted to being with the firm.  Romney has tried to dodge some of the more biting Obama campaign ads by claiming the conduct complained of came after he left as Bain's CEO in 1999.  The Boston Globe claims to have unearthed Bain documentation, filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, showing that Romney was ‘chairman of the board, chief executive officer, and president of Bain as late as 2002.  (There appear to be some Massachusetts state document filings in accord.)
The Romney campaign claims the information is ‘inaccurate’.  (I'm not certain that's the same thing as saying it's not generally true in all important respects, but that's pretty much all they've said ‘bout it so far, beyond the claim that Romney had no input on investments or management after 1999.)
It appears the Romney himself signed the documents in question.  Falsifying important information in these required government filings would probably be a felony offense.  Not to mention the political damage it could do to Romney's credibility with independent voters.

I suspect the calls for release of Romney's back tax returns, which he has so far strenuously and successfully resisted without apparent political damage to himself, just took on a bit more significance, even for many of Romney's present supporters.

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