Thursday, May 31, 2012

More banners from Egypt

From this afternoon.

This one reads, 'Down with the Ikhwan (Brotherhood). Down with Muhammad Mursi. Down with the rule of the Murshid.'

11 comments:

Anonymous said...

Welcome Home!

Zeyad said...

There is lots of talk of boycott on the Egyptian street, which does not bode well

   Lee C.  ―  U.S.A.    said...

 
      "…talk of boycott…"

I presume you mean a boycott of the run-off elections?  (I still don't quite get the popularity among Arabs of the theory that:  If you know your side is going to lose, honestly lose, then you can somehow preemptively de-legitimize the elections by simply refusing to vote at all.  I haven't figured out how that works in the Arab mind as of yet.  If they were boycotting on the theory that the elections were crooked and game irredeemably rigged, I get that, but just ‘cause your side is going to lose?)

Lynnette In Minnesota said...

The turn of events in Egypt has been very disappointing, unless whoever wins the runoff moderates his stand on issues.

You're right, Zeyad, a boycott doesn't sound good. I would hate to be in the position the Egyptians are now in.

Lynnette In Minnesota said...

Sandmonkey has a new post analyzing why the voting went as it did.

Zeyad said...

Lee, their mode if thinking is 'either I get to play or I burn down the playground' and I don't think it's just in the ME

   Lee C.  ―  U.S.A.    said...

 
      "…'either I get to play or I burn down the playground…"

I see.  My mistake was in assuming that they thought they were ‘de-legitimizing’ the elections somehow.  They're simply repudiating the results; they're not really democrats at all.  They don't really think democracy is necessarily more legitimate than taking power the old fashioned way--with gunfire.
Elections are okay if and only if they win them.  Okay, I can get that part, and, you're right.  The notion that elections are merely a convenient way to seize power or a damned and not necessarily binding inconvenience if they happen to go the other way, that's not nearly unique to the Middle East.  Been that way in vast swaths of Central and South America and Asia for years now.  Not to mention occasional outbreaks of such thinking in what one might consider more established democracies in Europe.

   Lee C.  ―  U.S.A.    said...

 
…small [d] democrats--not the American political party--those are capital [D] Democrats…

Lynnette In Minnesota said...

For democracy to work, the people in power, or vying for power, have to be willing to cede power to the will of the people. Yes, even if that will doesn't mean a mandate. It's not easy to do, even for established democracies.

Good night all! :)

Anonymous said...

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