الاثنين، مايو 21، 2012

Iraqi Kurdistan to push ahead with oil exports


ARBIL, Iraq, May 20 (Reuters) - Iraq's autonomous Kurdistan region said on Sunday it expects to start exporting its crude oil along a new pipeline to the Turkish border by August 2013, defying Baghdad in a long-running dispute over who controls the country's oil sales.

The Kurdistan region, which has its own government and armed forces, has already clashed with Iraq's central government over autonomy and oil rights, and halted its crude exports in April after accusing Baghdad of not making due payments.

"In August 2013 we will be able to directly export crude from the Kurdish region's fields," Hawrami said at an oil conference in Kurdistan on Sunday. "We will be responsible for exporting oil. It will still be Iraqi oil."

هناك 27 تعليقًا:

   Lee C.  ―  U.S.A.    يقول...

 
      "We will be responsible for exporting oil"

That will ratchet tensions up another notch.

Freddie Starr يقول...

Lee C done ate mah dang hamster!

   Lee C.  ―  U.S.A.    يقول...

 
Troll

   Lee C.  ―  U.S.A.    يقول...

 
Troll

غير معرف يقول...

Iraq buys US drones

Lynnette In Minnesota يقول...

So, if I understand this correctly, in the past the revenue from the oil exported from Kurdistan was collected by the central government in Baghdad, which then turned around and remitted a share to Kurdistan. Or was supposed to. Now because of the direct pipeline to Turkey the revenue will be collected by the local authorities in Kurdistan?

Who paid for the pipeline?

Lynnette In Minnesota يقول...

From Anonymous' article:

"We'd like Iraq to be considered as a dependable long-term supplier of world energy needs," al-Shahristani said.

To do that Iraq has to get its own house in order regarding oil revenue. Whether the central or the local government collects the payments revenue sharing has to be decided upon and adhered to.

Petes يقول...

You also have to decide how the contracted oil companies will be paid, Lynnette. Otherwise you will have regions competing against each other for contractors, as you have right now with the KRG and Exxon. Unfortunately the linkage between contracts and oil revenue disbursement was widely touted as an international conspiracy, by the looney left both outside and inside Iraq. And the present falling out is not just a Kurdish separatist element -- the south's dealings with Baghdad are equally in turmoil.

Marcus يقول...

Pete, regarding that "conspiracy", I still find it a bit strange that the proposed legislation was pushed for as a "revenue sharing" agreement that was needed to end the civil war. But read the law and it's a law regarding how foreign oil copmanies may operate in Iraq and how the royalties should be collected by Iraq. But it contains NOTHING about the actual revenue sharing within Iraq except a brief passage mentioning that an additional agreement on that would come later at some unspecified time in the future.

One could almost be forgiven for questioning the priorities... no?

So your mentioning of "the linkage between contracts and oil revenue disbursement", well the "conspiracy theory" is grounded in the absense of any such linkage in the very document that was it was suggested would adress it.

   Lee C.  ―  U.S.A.    يقول...

 
      "I still find it a bit strange that the proposed
      legislation was pushed for as a ‘revenue sharing’
      agreement that was needed to end the civil war.
"

Your recollection is a bit faulty there.  Certainly we (the U.S.A.) were pushing the Iraqi to implement a revenue sharing agreement.  But, we didn't get one; they couldn't come to an agreement; they kicked it down the road instead.  And we had to accept that.  Wasn't like we had a lot of choice.

Marcus يقول...

My recollection is not shaky at all. The oil law draft that we discussed so much was pushed for as a ‘revenue sharing’ agreement. But it wasn't one.

   Lee C.  ―  U.S.A.    يقول...

 
      "My recollection is not shaky at all."

I suppose the easiest way to settle that is for you to tell us who it was you recollect told you that they'd actually, successfully come to a revenue sharing agreement and written it into the law. 
Got a link you wanna share there?

(Having just recently gone over the problem of attempting proof of a negative, in a recent thread, I'm not gonna pretend I can prove you weren't told that by somebody.)

Marcus يقول...

First things first. You agree then that the proposed oil law does nothing at all to adress the issue of revenue sharing within Iraq? Just so we're clear on that.

   Lee C.  ―  U.S.A.    يقول...

 
Presuming you're referring to the same proposed legislation I am, i.e. the one that supposedly was gonna put Rex Tillerman on the Iraqi Oil and Gas Council, according to Raed Jarrar and you and Bruno and others…
Yeah, the last version of that I saw (February 2007 I believe it was) entirely punted on the subject.  It referred the problem to ‘subsequent legislation’ or a term similar to that.

   Lee C.  ―  U.S.A.    يقول...

 
Of course, that reminds me…
You and Bruno were told, and bought into, some pretty outlandish crap regarding that proposal.

Petes يقول...

My, my, Lee's in pretty argumentative mood this weather. Maybe the weather's as depressing there as it is here.

   Lee C.  ―  U.S.A.    يقول...

 
That supposed to be another example of me trolling you, is it?
‘Cause from where I sit, it looks like you didn't have anything to say on the subject at hand, but rather were phishing’ for a bite on a new subject of your own choosing.  That new subject bein’ you tryin’ to figure a way to get under my skin.

   Lee C.  ―  U.S.A.    يقول...

 
I am pleased to report that it's a beautiful day here.  I'd like to be outside just now, but have had to settle for havin’ all the windows open for a couple hours here in the middle of the day.  I'll get outside a little later.
I'm also pleased to know you're having depressing weather.

Lynnette In Minnesota يقول...

PeteS,

You also have to decide how the contracted oil companies will be paid, Lynnette. Otherwise you will have regions competing against each other for contractors, as you have right now with the KRG and Exxon.

I'm not sure that competition is a bad thing, Pete. Here we have cities competing for business investment by giving tax incentives. For an area where jobs are needed it is a useful tool.

And the present falling out is not just a Kurdish separatist element -- the south's dealings with Baghdad are equally in turmoil.

I can understand Baghdad's concern about control being set at the local level. But I don't see that Iraqis in general favor a breakup of the country, so perhaps an equitable solution would be contracts in every region specifically stating what share(a flat tax so to speak) of revenue is due the central government, and each company pays that directly to Baghdad, while paying the local authorities their share. Rather like our Federal and State withholding, which is paid direcetly to each governmental entity. The sticking point being deciding on what the amount of Baghdad's share would be. If the locals can negotiate with the oil companies a larger share for themselves, more power to them. But they would be competing with other regions, not Baghdad. And the more stable region would no doubt have a leg up in those negotiations, taking some of the heat off Baghdad for security issues.

Petes يقول...

The problem there, Lynnette, is that all sides are convinced that the other is cheating. So nobody wants to relinquish control of the purse strings and have their share of revenue remitted by someone else.

Needless to say also, the side controlling the purse strings is in the better position to fraudulently skim off some profits for themselves, or at least be in a position to buy favours. I would be surprised if that wasn't a big element of it.

Lynnette In Minnesota يقول...

Marcus,

Just so you know, it isn't just your Imams who have cornered the market on hateful ideas, this is our version.

Lynnette In Minnesota يقول...

PeteS,

Hmmm...I was forgetting that Iraq has more of a nationalized oil sector as opposed to a private one. There would have to be some sort of overwatch mechanism put in place to make sure everyone walked the straight and narrow. Somehow I don't think Iraqis would trust the private sector to handle it either, so privatization wouldn't be the answer. I'll think about it.

Zeyad يقول...

I actually view this as a positive development. Everyone was pushing for federalism, including PM Maliki, and they tripped over themselves to include in in the Iraqi "constitution". Maliki should be happy he got what he wished.

   Lee C.  ―  U.S.A.    يقول...

 
      "I actually view this as a positive development."

I understand how one can see things that way.  Joe Biden took a lot of shit for suggesting it was probably inevitable, and that the U.S. influence, so far as it went, should be directed at seeing that Iraqi federalism developed smoothly.  It can develop unsmoothly, like with military clashes up to and including an attempt at secession.  That would be bad.

Lynnette In Minnesota يقول...

Federalism

It does build a certain amount of flexibility into a system that would accomodate diverse people, yet allow them to function as one entity. And the Middle East is a tough region to go it alone, unless you actaully want to be obsorbed into neighboring countries.


Maliki should be happy he got what he wished.


Sometimes the process of getting what you wished for isn't always an easy thing. People don't always realize that.

(Reminds me, I've been meaning to read The Federalist Papers.)

gelnar يقول...

by the iraqi constitution the oil in all provinces/regions will be invested by the government and distributed fairly on all provinces/regions ....

so the kurds by defying the constitution they are defying the country as a whole ...they do consider becoming independent of iraq but they still need the finances of iraq considering that their region's oil exports aren't enough to cover their need

gelnar يقول...


and about exporting oil from their
region they've been already doing that for three years going against the government...

and recently ...the kurds stand on not letting the iraqi army petrol the borders has made them more guilty
earning them budget cuts from the government for the next few years until their debt to iraq is payed ..