Saturday, February 05, 2011

Nuri al-Maliki will not seek third term

Maliki is suddenly talking about 'change'. Odd.

Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri Maliki has said he will not seek a third term in office when his mandate runs out in 2014, state media say.

Mr Maliki returned for a second term after polls last year but endured nine months of wrangling before a unity government could be formed.

He said he would back the insertion of a clause in the constitution bringing in a two-term maximum.


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Not only that, but he gave up half his salary.

As unrest sweeps the Middle East, Iraqi Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki said he would give up half of his salary, a possible bid to head off simmering discontent.

Iraqis have held sporadic protests against food, power and water shortages and their plight acquired particular attention this month as a wave of anti-government protests rocked the region.

Maliki's media advisor, Ali al-Moussawi, said the premier would forego 50 percent of his $30,000 monthly paycheck to bring his salary closer to other government employees.

"He feels there is a huge difference and says this leads to a kind of caste system in society," Moussawi said. Maliki made the announcement in a statement late on Friday.


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55 comments:

Anonymous said...

I believe I can fly

   Lee C.  ―  U.S.A.       said...

   
Two terms for president and then out was a tradition over here started by George Washington, and observed voluntarily by every president who followed him up until Franklin Roosevelt in the 1930s.  Roosevelt went for a fourth term, but died early into it.  They fixed that soon after with a constitutional amendment limiting the president's ability to re-up for the job.  I don't think the tradition is all that common in parliamentary systems though.
I don't often have a lot of good things to say about Maliki.  (I try to no judge him too harshly either; could be worse.)  But I am pleased that he sees the wisdom of not having one guy hold on to the reins too long.  Probably get nicer things said about him in the history bookss too.

RhusLancia said...

wow, good on him.

Lynnette In Minnesota said...

Personally I can't understand why on earth anyone would want to stay in office for longer than 2 terms. I swear, every President we have ages at least 10 years in the first term. And in the Middle East it seems downright dangerous to stay longer.

Freddie al-Starr said...

Flying Anonymous ate my hamster

Petes said...

Maliki's obviously got the willies watching Egypt. And the Iraqi style of "protest" tends to be a lot less mild-mannered than the Egyptian one.

Petes said...

Holy padded shoulders, batman! Dallas is back! And with several of the original cast!

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-12331135

Um Ayad said...

Bush Cancels Swiss Visit Over Arrest Fears
The former leader had been due to speak at a charity gala, making the keynote speech at Keren Hayesod's annual dinner on February 12.
But human rights groups in the country have been calling for the Swiss government to arrest him over allegations he ordered the torture of prisoners.
Court officials have said criminal complaints against Mr Bush have been lodged in Geneva but Swiss officials said he would enjoy some diplomatic immunity as a former head of state.

Torture is a crime under international law and human rights experts say absolute prohibition is very clear.

http://news.sky.com/skynews/Home/World-News/George-W-Bush-Former-President-Cancels-Visit-To-Switzerland-Over-Fears-He-Could-Be-Arrested/Article/

Bush trip to Switzerland called off amid threats of protests, legal action

A planned trip to Switzerland next week by George W. Bush was canceled after human rights activists called for demonstrations and threatened legal action over allegations that the former president sanctioned the torture of terrorism suspects.
The New York-based Center for Constitutional Rights and several European human rights groups said they were planning to file a complaint against Bush and wanted Swiss prosecutors to open a criminal case against him once he arrived in the country.
In what would have been his first European trip since leaving the presidency, Bush was scheduled to speak in Geneva on Feb. 12 at a dinner in honor of the United Israel Appeal. A lawyer for the organization said Bush's appearance was canceled because of the risk of violence, and that the threat of legal action was not an issue.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/02/05/AR2011020502822.html

Um Ayad said...

If Nuri al-Maliki gives up half of his salary I wonder if Mubarak will give half his family fortune to the Egyptian people?

Mubarak family fortune could reach $70bn, say experts

President Hosni Mubarak's family fortune could be as much as $70bn (£43.5bn) according to analysis by Middle East experts, with much of his wealth in British and Swiss banks or tied up in real estate in London, New York, Los Angeles and along expensive tracts of the Red Sea coast.

After 30 years as president and many more as a senior military official, Mubarak has had access to investment deals that have generated hundreds of millions of pounds in profits. Most of those gains have been taken offshore and deposited in secret bank accounts or invested in upmarket homes and hotels.
According to a report last year in the Arabic newspaper Al Khabar, Mubarak has properties in Manhattan and exclusive Beverly Hills addresses on Rodeo Drive.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/feb/04/hosni-mubarak-family-fortune

Ayman said...

Maybe the voters will make sure that Maliki doesn't change his mind in 2014 by reducing the number of seats Maliki's party controls.

Ayman said...

I don't know about Egypt. But I think Tunisia is going to be a success.

Um Ayad said...

Prince Hassan on Sky News speaks about the "Elephants" in the room.

Video 11.14 minutes:

Prince Hassan of Jordan speaks on the troubles in Egypt and the future of the Middle East.

http://news.sky.com/skynews/Home/video/Prince-Hassan-Jordan-Speaks-To-Dermot-Murnaghan-On-Egypt-And-Middle-East/Video/201102115924244?lid=VIDEO_15924244_PrinceHassanJordan:SpeaksToDermotMurnaghanOnEgyptAndMiddleEast&lpos=searchresults

Don Cox said...

"And in the Middle East it seems downright dangerous to stay longer."

If a leader has been stealing funds and jailing his opponents, it becomes dangerous to leave power. At best, he would have to go into exile.

Also, Presidents' wives do like the status and the shopping.

Don Cox said...

"But I think Tunisia is going to be a success."

Let's hope so. I think people underestimate how difficult democracy is. It isn't just a matter of purple fingers.

Ayman said...

"It isn't just a matter of purple fingers."

But let's not discount the purple fingers either. When a government is formed by purple fingers instead of chopped, severed fingers, at it was under Saddam, it is a huge improvement, even if the purple finger based government sucks.

Bruno said...

"It isn't just a matter of purple fingers."

Maybe you ought to tell that to the murkins. They had foreign-policy orgasms over the purple fingers in Iraq. I guess it's one of those selective things ... purple fingers solve everything if it's in the murkin interest, but not, if it's not.

Bruno said...

"Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton cautioned Sunday that Egyptians have to overcome numerous obstacles to pull off elections in September to replace President Hosni Mubarak and acknowledged that ousting him beforehand might roil the transition to democracy. "

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/02/06/AR2011020602919_pf.html

... No such fears were apparent in the case of Iraq, however. Why would that be?

"The Egyptian military has rounded up scores of human rights activists, protest organizers and journalists in recent days without charging them, according to watchdog groups and accounts by the detainees. While most arrests have been brief , experts say they are a sign that the regime's notorious tradition of extrajudicial detentions is continuing even as Mubarak appears to be on his way out of power. "

http://www.miamiherald.com/2011/02/06/2053915/arbitrary-arrests-point-to-military.html

Soon, the ape will come and remind us again about the billions the US spent in supporting 'the military'...

Faux News getting a taste of Mubarak:

"People are all over him," Palkot said of his colleague. "Within about 30 seconds, people are all over us -- and that's where our life or death struggle began." Palkot said he was pummeled with open hands, fists, sticks and rocks. Attackers were "principally going for the head again and again and again. The head was the target but the rest of the body is fair game too."

http://nation.foxnews.com/egypt-protests/2011/02/06/exclusive-fox-news-reporters-recall-savage-beating-egypt

Iraq news:

Officials in Iraq have begun to restore the notorious "Hands of Victory" arch in Baghdad, enraging many who see the massive bronze sculpture commissioned by Saddam Hussein to mark the war with Iran as a symbol of the brutality and excesses of his long rule. The sculpture's fists were modelled on the dictator's own hands, and its restoration is part of a multi-million-dollar project to beautify the city ahead of an Arab League meeting in Baghdad later this year. The imposing 140ft monument – commissioned at the height of the 1980-1988 Iran-Iraq war – fell into disrepair after the US-led invasion ousted Saddam in 2003, and was partially dismantled four years ago.

http://www.iraqnews.net/story.php?rid=42711779

   Lee C.  ―  U.S.A.       said...

   
      "Maybe you ought to tell that to the murkins
      …everything if it's in the murkin interest, but not,
      if it's not.
"
      Bruno @ 12:23 AM
      "Hillary Rodham Clinton cautioned Sunday that
      Egyptians have to overcome numerous obstacles …
"
      Bruno @ 12:36 AM

I been watchin’ Egyptians on television…watching people say they're not afraid anymore; been afraid too long and not going to be afraid anymore.  New day dawning…
And then here's Bruno.  Not about Egypt nor the Egyptians for him; (not about Iraq nor the Iraqi for him either) can never be be about those thing for him.  For him it's always ‘bout the Evil Merkins.  Everything is always ‘bout the Evil Merkins.  (spelt ‘murkins’ for him, adjusting for his guttural Afrikkaner accent, which he also cannot escape)  Everything is always ‘bout the Evil Merkins for him, and always will it be so for him.
Thankfully, he's a relic.
World is moving on, and he's still Bruno, and he's already come come the closest he'll ever come to catchin’ up.




     

   Lee C.  ―  U.S.A.       said...

  
      "Faux News getting a taste of Mubarak:"

He means "FoxNews", and thinks that's all ‘bout the Evil Merkins too.  (Although Rupert Murdoch, owner of FoxNews is actually Australian by birth, and owns lefty news services in Europe; whatever makes the bucks.)

Bruno said...

I notice that the simian was successfully enraged this morning. Yup, steamin' an' hollerin' an' rantin' as is his wont. His poor ol' ticker racing 180 beats a minute ... with any luck it will pop for good.

Meanwhile I notice that:

1: He's not crowing so much about murkin support for the Egyptian army anymore

2: He successfully evaded the prickly question as to why we should be concerned about "a smooth transition of power" in Egypt ... but the Iraqis weren't worthy enough to qualify for such a "smooth transition".

3: The irony of Faux News getting pummelled by the same spectrum of thugs that they'd be likely to applaud is lost on him.

Bruno said...

Iraq helped by Egypt protests:

"Iraq raised its proposed 2011 budget to 96.6 trillion Iraq dinars ($81.86 billion), compared with last year's budget of $71.3 billion due to a recent rise in oil prices, a government spokesman said Sunday. Oil prices have spiked due to political protests and tensions in Egypt. Brent crude hit $100 a barrel for the first time since 2008 on fears instability could spread through the Middle East, which together with North Africa pumps over a third of the world's oil. The Iraqi cabinet in an emergency meeting Sunday decided to raise its 2011 oil prices estimates to an average of $76.50 a barrel, instead of the $73 a barrel it proposed earlier, Ali Al Dabbagh said in a statement. "

Bruno said...

Link:

http://online.wsj.com/article/BT-CO-20110206-702767.html

Petes said...

How was that smooth Iraqi transition going to work, Bruno? Are you still fantasising about Saddam offering to leave for a mere pittance of a billion dollars of Iraqi cash?

Bruno said...

I take it that PeteS still buys the Neocon koolaid that was fed to him - ie - that Iraqis are merely Murkins in drag, and that they would react to being bombed, bullied and murdered by offering marines sweets and cakes ...?

Bruno said...

Earth to PeteS.

Earth to PeteS.

Your coffee is cold.

Please wake up!

Ayman said...

Regarding a "smooth transition" from dictatorship to representative government.

Such transitions are seldom smooth. Dictatorships often go through a crisis when a dictator dies or becomes ill and there is a power struggle among the "elite" to determine who is going to take power.

So, often civil war results when a country attempts to make the transition to representative government and sometimes the transition is not complete, as one faction takes over and it becomes a dictatorship.

This was the case in Russia in 1917 and in Iran in 1979.

Bruno said...

A spokesman for Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki says he hasn't ruled out a third term as premiere, but supports a constitutional change setting two-term limits.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704858404576128532856114202.html

Don said...

"But let's not discount the purple fingers either. "

No indeed. But voting is just the beginning.

   Lee C.  ―  U.S.A.       said...

 
      "1: He's not crowing so much about murkin
      support for the Egyptian army anymore
"

That kept coming up in the context of your claims that we were supporting Mubarak, a claim you seem to have recently dropped.  (Truth is rather that we bribed him to support us)

      "2: He successfully evaded the prickly question
      as to why we should be concerned about 'a
      smooth transition of power‘ in Egypt ... but the
      Iraqis weren't worthy enough to qualify for such a
      'smooth transition'
"

So far no one has posed such a question.  I found it easy ‘nuff to not engage with a question never asked.

      "3: The irony of Faux News getting pummelled by
      the same spectrum of thugs that they'd be likely
      to applaud is lost on him.
"

You're apparently not keeping up with the program.  Our right-wingers are rather desperately searching for some reason to denounce the uprising in Egypt.  (For no better reason that I can make out than that the Obama administration has cut Mubarak loose, and they feel they simply must oppose Obama in all things--sorta like you gotta make everything always be ‘bout the Evil Merkins.)    They are, however, struggling to find support among the Republican leadership in Congress, who are, so far, simply not going along with Glenn Hannibaugh and the FoxNews crowd on this one. So far, best they can come up with is the specter of disorder and chaos in the streets, so a little pummeling of reporters is okay with them.  (Although the reporters tend to object.)

You're being a rather clueless bastard this morning.  (Must be why you think you managed to ‘enrage’ me.)
.

Bruno said...

FLEE "we were supporting Mubarak ... Truth is rather that we bribed him to support us"

" Doublespeak is language that deliberately disguises, distorts, or reverses the meaning of words. Doublespeak may take the form of euphemisms (e.g., "downsizing" for layoffs), making the truth less unpleasant, without denying its nature. "

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doublespeak

BRUNO "He successfully evaded the prickly question as to why we should be concerned about "a smooth transition of power" in Egypt ... but the Iraqis weren't worthy enough to qualify for such a "smooth transition"."
FLEE "So far no one has posed such a question."

... except for that I just did, and you managed to 'engage' with it anyway, by pointing it out.

FLEE "Rupert Murdoch, owner of FoxNews is actually Australian by birth, and owns lefty news services"
BRUNO "The irony of Faux News getting pummelled by the same spectrum of thugs"
FLEE "You're apparently not keeping up with the program. Our right-wingers are"

Gosh, the simian seems to have his foot stuck in his mouth ... again.

LOL

Are you steaming yet, sonny?

   Lee C.  ―  U.S.A.       said...

  
      "…except for that I just did [pose the question]."

Did ya now?  And just where and when did you do that?

Bruno said...

My, he seems rather irked.

Bruno said...

YE GAWDS ... but the koolaid is strong:

"More than four years after leaving public life, former Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld continues to believe the war in Iraq was worth the effort, and has no apologies for his decision-making in leading the campaigns in Afghanistan and Iraq."

http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/donald-rumsfeld-diane-sawyer-exclusive-interview-troop-decisions/story?id=12853695

Bruno said...

FINALLY THE REAL REASON FOR INVADING IRAQ:

“He was thinking about invading Iraq in 1999,” Herskowitz told me in our 2004 interview, leaning in a little to make sure I could hear him properly. “It was on his mind. He said to me: ‘One of the keys to being seen as a great leader is to be seen as a commander in chief.’ And he said, ‘ My father had all this political capital built up when he drove the Iraqis out of Kuwait, and he wasted it.’ He said, ‘If I have a chance to invade . . . if I had that much capital, I’m not going to waste it. I’m going to get everything passed that I want to get passed, and I’m going to have a successful presidency.’ ”

Herskowitz said that Bush expressed frustration at a lifetime as an underachiever in the shadow of an accomplished father. In aggressive military action, he saw the opportunity to emerge from his father’s shadow.

[...]

Herskowitz said that George W. Bush’s beliefs on Iraq were based in part on a notion dating back to the Reagan White House, and ascribed in part to Dick Cheney, who was then a powerful congressman. “Start a small war. Pick a country where there is justification you can jump on, go ahead and invade.

Bush’s circle of preelection advisers had a fixation on the political capital that British prime minister Margaret Thatcher had amassed from the Falklands War with Argentina.

http://blogs.alternet.org/speakeasy/2011/02/07/finally-the-real-reason-for-invading-iraq/

Bruno said...

Well, now, invading Iraq was well worth the building up of political capital by a loser drunkard with small man syndrome.

//sarcasm.

   Lee C.  ―  U.S.A.       said...

Near as I can tell, Bruno has decided to make some unfocused babble, ignore the question that I did actually ask (complete with question marks, two of them in fact) and take of on tangent 'bout the Evil Merkins again (in the form of comments about George W. and Rumsfeld this time, with a little Cheney thrown in for good measure).

As ya'll can surely see if ya just look.  He simply cannot disengage from that; it's all about the Evil Merkins for him, always that, all the time.  That's all he's got; that's all he's ever had.

And so, with the observation first made and now proved, I do believe my work here is done for the day.  Ya'll have a nice day now.

Anonymous said...

A most informative piece,
'Washington’s Secret History with the Muslim Brotherhood' by Ian Johnson, "New York Review of Books":

http://www.nybooks.com/blogs/nyrblog/2011/feb/05/washingtons-secret-history-muslim-brotherhood/

Lynnette In Minnesota said...

Drat! Lee beat me to the punch...

And then here's Bruno. Not about Egypt nor the Egyptians for him; (not about Iraq nor the Iraqi for him either) can never be be about those thing for him. For him it's always ‘bout the Evil Merkins.

One might say selective in his comments.

[Bruno] Well, now, invading Iraq was well worth the building up of political capital by a loser drunkard with small man syndrome.

Takes a lot of strength of will to quick drinking if you are truly an alcoholic. That's not the definition of a loser, Bruno.

[Ayman] So, often civil war results when a country attempts to make the transition to representative government and sometimes the transition is not complete, as one faction takes over and it becomes a dictatorship.

This was the case in Russia in 1917 and in Iran in 1979.


Which is why a careful transition that lets everyone have a voice is crucial. Even the United States did not avoid a bloody civil war.

[Don Cox] Also, Presidents' wives do like the status and the shopping.

Possably so. It's a rare person where power and status doesn't affect them to a certain extent.

Anonymous said...

Maliki takes all the power he can. In return he gives out promises that he will leave some day. What would happen if he just casually changed his mind one day after he's used his power to stifle democratic opposition?

Ayman said...

What would happen if he just casually changed his mind one day after he's used his power to stifle democratic opposition?

That's what some say is happening in Turkey under Prime Minister Erdogan. A cracking down on hostile press; putting journalists critical of Erdogan's party in jail.

That's where representative government can collapse, when the basic civil rights of the opposition are violated.

Um Ayad said...

George Bush calls off trip to Switzerland

The visit would have been Bush's first to Europe since he admitted in his autobiography, Decision Points, in November that he had authorised the use of waterboarding – simulated drowning – on detainees at Guantánamo accused of links with al-Qaida. Whether out of concern over the protests or the arrest warrant, it is an extraordinary development for a former US president to have his travel plans curtailed in this way, and amounts to a victory for human rights campaigners....

"Bush enjoys no immunity from prosecution. As head of state he authorised and condoned acts of torture, and the law is clear – where a person has been responsible for torture, all states have an obligation under international law to open an investigation and prosecute." He added: "Bush will be pursued wherever he goes as a war criminal and torturer."

http://www.guardian.co.uk/law/2011/feb/06/george-bush-trip-to-switzerland

Bridget said...

I've been hoping against hope that Maliki would do something like this. George Washington is still given a great deal of credit in American history textbooks for establishing the tradition in the American presidency of voluntarily stepping aside after two terms. If he keeps his word, Iraqi schoolchildren may be studying about the Maliki, the father of democracy in Iraq, 200 years hence. Not to mention the example he'd be setting for other countries in the region aspiring to democracy.

Bruno said...

That simian stew appears to be bubbling nicely.

Bruno said...

[Bruno] Well, now, invading Iraq was well worth the building up of political capital by a loser drunkard with small man syndrome.
[lynnette] Takes a lot of strength of will to quick drinking if you are truly an alcoholic. That's not the definition of a loser, Bruno.

I dunno about that.

I thought that quick drinking was the whole point of what alcoholics do.

On the other hand, perhaps the minnesotan versions of alcoholics specialize in slow, but steady, drinking. Either way, I fail to grasp how drinking quickly or slowly requires strength of will.

Bruno said...

I tried hard to find some non-murkin related news in Iraq this morning, but failed.

Googling "Iraq" into the News came up with this:

"The former US defence secretary, Donald Rumsfeld, admits in his memoirs that he made a mistake in claiming that Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction sites round Baghdad and Tikrit, one of the main justifications for launching the Iraq invasion. Rumsfeld says now: "I made a misstatement." What he meant to say is there were 'suspect sites'."

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/feb/08/donald-rumsfeld-book-misstatements-wmd

"A US Marine captain was sentenced to six years in federal prison for conspiring with his wife to skim nearly $1.7 million from government contracts in Iraq."

http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5iyZ9YLVESw8ppuHHl2RIDa7IKA5Q?docId=CNG.18f7ce5b4ad7a7bfbfb07c18ac5e6163.441

"Army Reserve Sgt. 1st Class Lawrence Morrison was deployed to Iraq in 2005 as a Civil Affairs officer despite a bad knee, a bum shoulder, and high blood pressure. He was killed by an improvised explosive device."

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-31727_162-20030863-10391695.html

Truly touching:

"This is Michael’s second tour of duty in Iraq; he’s in Bravo Company in the 1st Calvary Division. With sights set on a military career, he would like to go to Afghanistan or Special Forces. “That’s my job, that’s where the fight is,” Michael says. “Gosh — oh, law,” Terri says, tears coming to her eyes. Going to war affects the men and women in uniform who serve the United States — and their families, too."

http://www.salisburypost.com/News/020811-in-service-michael-hill-qcd

.... gosh how tough and brave them murkins are. Let's not forget that our real sympathies should lie with the tough and brave murkins and not the hundreds of thousands of dead Iraqis that the invasion caused.

Bruno said...

THIS could put a bit of a cramp in the war effort in Afghanistan:

The central justification of the U.S.-NATO war against the Afghan Taliban – that the Taliban would allow al-Qaeda to return to Afghanistan – has been challenged by new historical evidence of offers by the Taliban leadership to reconcile with the Hamid Karzai government after the fall of the Taliban government in late 2001. The evidence of the Taliban peace initiatives comes from a new paper drawn from the first book-length study of Taliban-al-Qaeda relations thus far, as well as an account in another recent study on the Taliban in Kandahar province by journalist Anand Gopal.

http://original.antiwar.com/porter/2011/02/07/evidence-of-2002-taliban-offer-damages-myth-of-al-qaeda-ties/

LOL, those Taliban are pretty stupid. Didn't they know that the only way to "reconcile" with the Amreeki is to kill enough of them to make it stick? Historically, this has always been so, whether that be Vietnam or Iraq.

Bruno said...

WMD ALERT WMD ALERT WMD ALERT WMD ALERT WMD ALERT WMD ALERT WMD ALERT WMD ALERT
PANIC PANIC PANIC PANIC PANIC PANIC PANIC PANIC PANIC PANIC PANIC PANIC PANIC

With Egypt in revolt and the country’s future uncertain, concern is growing over whether a new government in the Arab world’s most militarily and industrially advanced country could accelerate an arms race in one of the world’s most volatile regions.

At the heart of the concern is intelligence indicating that Egypt has quietly carried out research and development on weapons of mass destruction, including nuclear, chemical, biological and missile technology.

The research and development has continued virtually without pause over the past three decades, according to interviews with U.S. officials and a review of intelligence and other government documents by NBC News.

Specifically, the intelligence indicates that Egypt has carried out experiments in plutonium reprocessing and uranium enrichment, helped jump-start Saddam Hussein’s missile and chemical weapons programs in Iraq, and worked with Kim Jong Il on North Korea’s missile program.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/41452744/ns/world_news-mideastn_africa

WMD ALERT WMD ALERT WMD ALERT WMD ALERT WMD ALERT WMD ALERT WMD ALERT WMD ALERT
PANIC PANIC PANIC PANIC PANIC PANIC PANIC PANIC PANIC PANIC PANIC PANIC PANIC

... sounds like it's time for another "pre-emptive liberation", eh?

RhusLancia said...

Oh, now there were no ties between the Taliban and al Qaeda??

Taliban to NATO, 2002: "hey, how's about you quit kicking our *sses and we'll quit being BFFs with AQ?"

Bruno, if they'd said 'yes': "See? the eevil merkins will make deals with the devils themselves if it suits their purposes and eeeevil policies..."

Bruno, today: "THIS [2002 offer of a deal with the toppled Taliban] could put a bit of a cramp in the war effort in Afghanistan:"

Bruno said...

Nonsense, Rhus. America and the Taliban should keep killing each other in Afghanistan forever. No peace, no mercy, never. I agree with y'all rednecks, yeehah!

RhusLancia said...

Bruno: famously disgruntled since April 27, 1994.

Lynnette In Minnesota said...

[lynnette] Takes a lot of strength of will to quick drinking if you are truly an alcoholic. That's not the definition of a loser, Bruno.

[Bruno] I dunno about that.


Typos will do that to you. :(

Either way, I fail to grasp how drinking quickly or slowly requires strength of will.

Actually, when it comes to an addiction, I can see where it might take strength of will to regulate the rate of consumption.

But, anyway, as you very well know, unless you insist on being totally obtuse, what I really meant to write was that it takes strength of will to quit drinking.

*sigh*

Bruno said...

[rhus] "Bruno: famously disgruntled since April 27, 1994."

"Nelson Mandela felt so betrayed by Tony Blair's decision to join the invasion of Iraq that he made a furious phone call to a UK minister to protest. Labour MP Peter Hain, whose biography of the ex-South African president is published on Monday, said Mr Mandela was "breathing fire" down the line."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-11277148

Um, no.

Bruno said...

[lynnette] "unless you insist on being totally obtuse"

But Lynnette! I thought that was the coy little game we were playing with each other.

Oh, very well. If you insist on a real-world interpretation of your comment ... I agree with what you meant to say.

Lynnette In Minnesota said...

I thought that was the coy little game we were playing with each other.

Fair enough. But sometimes one just has to be serious.

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