Thursday, February 17, 2011

Bahrain

Mahmood has insight on the protests in Bahrain

9 comments:

Lynnette In Minnesota said...

Mahmood about the government:

They attacked peaceful demonstrators, like the gentleman you see above, and the hundreds of women and children at the Pearl Roundabout and at various processions. It’s as if the demands are a serious slight in the face of the government and the ruling family. Why?

Why?

Here is the crux of the problem. It pervades the entire Middle East. It is a serious disrespect for the human life of the "other". The other religion, the other gender, the other economic strata, anyone that does not fit into one's own mold.

Zeyad,

I know that in the past you have linked or quoted from articles by Nir Rosen. So I had to make mention of the mess he has created for himself. Because in a way it too is a symptom of what is wrong. I don't care who was assaulted, it is not right to make a mockery of the incident. It is not right to judge someone by the shade of their skin or their economic good(or bad) fortune. And if someone like Nir Rosen, who was a respected writer in many quarters, can do so, then how can tolerance of the "other" be fostered? How can real change be brought about in the Middle East?

Bruno said...

That's a good website, offering up a lot of insight into the turbulence in Bahrain right now. Irony is, the protesters weren't even originally demanding a change of government. The use of force there may change that equation.

Bruno said...

Baghdadis chuffed with US occupation:

"Baghdad's city hall has demanded $1 billion and an apology from the US military, accusing the force that led an invasion to oust Saddam Hussein of turning a "beautiful city into a military camp."

In a statement published on its website late on Wednesday, the city council cited damage done to the city by the erection of concrete blast walls, seen throughout the Iraqi capital, as well as the use of Humvee military vehicles.

"Baghdad city council demands the United States pay compensation estimated at $1 billion as a result of damage to infrastructure and issue an apology to the people of Baghdad," the statement said.

"Anyone can recognise what American forces have done to Baghdad by turning this beautiful city into a military camp and destroying streets and communities.""

http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5gJWVEfujJaWNoS4kazzKIaOlJRmQ?docId=CNG.ed01c1f733f7929c0e0ee596f28a0c53.5c1

Bruno said...

[lynnette] "Here is the crux of the problem. It pervades the entire Middle East. It is a serious disrespect for the human life of the "other"."

"For the second time this week, U.S. soldiers fired on anti-American protesters Wednesday in the city of Fallujah; the mayor said two people were killed and 14 wounded. The shooting in Fallujah, 30 miles west of Baghdad, occurred less than 48 hours after gunfire during a demonstration Monday night that hospital officials said killed 13 Iraqis. About 1,000 people marched down the city's main street Wednesday to protest the earlier incident, stopping in front of a battalion headquarters of the U.S. Army's 82nd Airborne Division"

http://www.commondreams.org/headlines03/0430-01.htm

Yeah, those goddamn "Middle - east" folks and their lack of respect for the life of the "other". It pervades their culture, you see.

   Lee C.  ―  U.S.A.       said...

 
      "For the second time this week, U.S. soldiers
      fired on anti-American protesters Wednesday in
      the city of Fallujah.
"
 
The 82nd Airborne was pulled out of Fallujah six (6) years ago.  The Marine Expeditionary Force which replaced them was pulled out three (3) years ago.  Neither force shot anybody in Fallujah this past week.

Lynnette In Minnesota said...

They attacked peaceful demonstrators, Mahmood

It is questionable whether or not the demonstrations in Fallujah in 2003 were peaceful.

[Bruno]Yeah, those goddamn "Middle - east" folks and their lack of respect for the life of the "other". It pervades their culture, you see.

Their culture, Bruno? Interesting theory. So, how does one change a "cultural" more?

We ended up fighting a war partly over slavery. Do you suggest that people in the Middle East fight a war over the objectification of women? Or over the discrimination over sexual orientation? Or for the lack of equality with regard to religion?

Well, that might get the attention of various governments in the region, certainly. But that alone won't enact permanent change. After all you might just get more of the same. You need a top down and bottom up approach, I think. That is, a government that allows for individual freedom and human dignity(what do you know, kind of like what some of the protestors are fighting for now) and a home life that encourages the same. I don't care how old you are, your Mother can still intimidate.

And, perhaps, last but not least, zero tolerance for behavior that encourages lack of respect for other people. Whoever they are.

John said...

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)is a condition in which the liquid content of the stomach regurgitates (backs up or refluxes) into the esophagus. The liquid can inflame and damage the lining of the esophagus. The regurgitated liquid usually contains acid and bile.

'GERD' is most often exacerbated and, at times, can even be caused by inadvertently happening upon any one of the wretched smelling comments excreted from the calloused anal cavity of this shebitch Lyingette.

This open-sored, blood fetishist who, for years, has derived a sick and perverted form of sexual gratification and release while she watched and defended the never ending stream of atrocities committed in Iraq at the hands of her country's liberators.

But as nauseating as this nasty little ignoramus might have been over the years, when happening across her latest comment about a Middle-Easterner's propensity to 'disrespect human life', one tends to forget the inconvenience of acid reflux and hope instead that your projectile vomit isn't going to necessitate the purchase of a new keyboard?

   Lee C.  ―  U.S.A.       said...

 
New posts by Mahmood

Bruno said...

[lynnette] "Their culture, Bruno? Interesting theory."

*cough-cough*

That's *your* theory, I submit.

As per your comment, supra.