Monday, January 03, 2011

A Tour of Iraq's Ancient Sites

From the NYT blog (nice photos in link):

Saddam Hussein’s regime, which was never kind to antiquities, cleared Kirkuk’s citadel of most of its inhabitants in the 1980’s and destroyed their homes as part of a reclamation project.

Such projects have long been a focus of the American efforts to win hearts and minds and rebuild Iraq. The American military has spent $220,000 to spruce up the grounds at Aqar Quf, including a museum that might one day again house ancient Kassite relics, evacuated to the National Museum during the Persian Gulf War in 1991. The provincial reconstruction team in Babel province did the same for the museum in Babylon.

But local and federal officials are beginning to see their revival as part of the process of making the country whole again, economically and psychologically.

There. I added links to some of the stuff that Stephen, Stephen and Shiho or their editors decided was not relevant or perhaps not fit to print.

14 comments:

Freddie Starr said...

The Bush administration ate my hamster.

Hamster Rights First said...

Well we need to ensure they don't eat anyone else's hamsters. A few years ago it seemed there was no stopping the hamster-eaters from eating up all the hamsters of the world, leaving the rest of us in ruins without hamsters. We tried to explain to their enablers that they were being willfully duped, but they did not listen maybe because the hamster-eaters held them by the balls or maybe because they realized that they have to stay silent if they are to continue getting their hamster scraps. Now, they too will have no hamsters left, because the greedy hamster-eaters will not stop until they eat every last hamster on earth and now they're asking for the scraps to be returned.

Anonymous said...

An excellent post.

Chomp My Hamster said...

Hamster-eating is fun.

introvert said...

"There. I added links..."

Thank you.

Lynnette In Minnesota said...

Sad to say that many things suffer when ruled by a dictator and when used as a battlefield.

The Ishtar Gate, replica or no, is beautiful, btw.

Zeyad said...

Those sites can be saved and made even better than before. There are endless archaeological and historical treasures beneath those sandy mounds that litter the whole country and even under the Gulf waters. We just need to keep some filthy paws off of them and declare them as sites of human heritage, not owned by the Iraqi government or any backwards provincial council. They don't deserve a single fils from these wonders that our ancestors left behind.

Lynnette In Minnesota said...

We just need to keep some filthy paws off of them and declare them as sites of human heritage,...

Unfortunately, not always an easy thing when other issues prevail, Z.

If you ever get a chance to watch it you may find the series they did on the creation of our(US) National Park system interesting. There were some wise people way back when who realized that preserving our natural wonders for future generations was important. Those are the kind of people working on this that you need in Iraq.

Zeyad said...

Yes, I'm sure it's very difficult to go after these guys and and whoever is behind them:

Selling these Sumerian treasures for as low as $200 a piece? I sure wish that is a hoax.

Lynnette In Minnesota said...

Oh, those guys. I thought you were referring to someone else.

I'm not sure whose jurisdiction that kind of thing falls under. I know the FBI certainly takes an interest in some things that take place on the Internet. I also think they and Interpol may have helped in the past with recovery of Iraqi artifacts. It would probably take a push by the Iraqi or US governments to get the ball rolling.

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