Monday, December 13, 2010

Iraqi child prodigy

Iraq's youngest photographer was born in the same year his country was invaded by the United States. But the young man known as the boy wonder refuses to take any pictures of the violence that surrounds him.

24 comments:

JG said...

Just saw this report earlier today. Excellent. Great kid, good luck to him.

Rawya Rageh is a good reporter.

Freddie Starr said...

JG ate my hamster

Bruno said...

Hey cool, looks a bit like my brother when he was small! :)

Bruno said...

Just another day viewing twisted American foreign policy:

"Frazer certainly tried to distance the United States from responsibility for the Ethiopian invasion in a number of interviews she gave to the media at the time. But one of the released WikiLeaks cables suggests a different picture, one that implicates Frazer in pressing Ethiopia’s President Meles Zenawi to invade his neighbor.
[...]
Frazer spread rumors of a possible jihadist takeover in Somalia that would threaten Ethiopian security.
[...]
It resulted in 20,000 deaths and according to some reports, left up to 2 million Somalis homeless. The 50,000 Ethiopian invasion force, which had expected a cakewalk, instead ran into a buzz saw of Somali resistance, got bogged down, and soon withdrew with its tail between its legs. The political result of the invasion was predictable: the generally more moderate Union of Islamic Courts was weakened, but it was soon replaced in Somalia by far more radical and militant Islamic groups with a more openly anti-American agenda.

http://original.antiwar.com/prince/2010/12/13/wikileaks-reveals-us-twisted-ethiopias-arm-to-invade-somalia/

MishMash said...

Way to go, Qamar.

Lynnette In Minnesota said...

A lovely story, Zeyad. I hope things work out well for him. Not only is he talented he also seems wise beyond his years. :)

Hi, JG. :)

Petes said...

[bruno]: Hey cool, looks a bit like my brother when he was small! :)

Hopefully that doesn't mean he'll look like this when he's big.

C.H. said...

PeteS,

Good to see that Bruno is no longer just a faceless apologist for terrorism on the other side of the world :)

Bruno said...

Apologists for terror:

"After World War II, American counterintelligence recruited former Gestapo officers, SS veterans and Nazi collaborators to an even greater extent than had been previously disclosed and helped many of them avoid prosecution or looked the other way when they escaped, according to thousands of newly declassified documents. "

http://www.fff.org/blog/jghblog2010-12-14.asp

Apologists for crime:

"Kosovo's prime minister is the head of a "mafia-like" Albanian group responsible for smuggling weapons, drugs and human organs through eastern Europe, according to a Council of Europe inquiry report on organised crime. Hashim Thaçi is identified as the boss of a network that began operating criminal rackets in the runup to the 1999 Kosovo war, and has held powerful sway over the country's government since. [...] Marty is critical of the western powers which have provided a supervisory role in Kosovo's emergence as a state, for failing to hold senior figures, including Thaçi, to account. His report criticises "faltering political will on the part of the international community to effectively prosecute the former leaders of the KLA""

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/dec/14/kosovo-prime-minister-llike-mafia-boss

Apologists for war:

"During his visit to Islamabad today, Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Admiral Michael Mullen warned Pakistan that the US feels growing “strategic impatience” against them over their delay in executing the long-demanded invasion of North Waziristan Agency."

http://news.antiwar.com/2010/12/14/mullen-demands-pakistan-attack-north-waziristan/

oh, and, surprise-surprise, sanctions against Iraq have been kept in place all this time:

"The UN Security Council will on Wednesday end a swathe of Saddam Hussein-era sanctions against Iraq in a sign of the changes in the country, diplomats said. US Vice President Joe Biden will chair a Security Council meeting that will lift the international penalties mainly dating from Saddam's 1990 invasion of neighbouring Kuwait that set off the first Gulf War."

http://www.middle-east-online.com/english/?id=43020

... so much for a sovereign Iraq, eh?

C.H. said...

As hard as it is to say, I am actually in agreement with Bruno on his last point. The fact that the UN kept the genocidal sanctions in place is sickening, although not surprising. This is, after all, an organization that promoted "oil for food" and did nothing to stop the Rwandan Genocide.

Bruno said...

Cue the vomitous American hypocrite:

[ch] "The fact that the UN kept the genocidal sanctions in place is sickening"

Only a murkin warmonger with his brain injected directly with the strongest koolaid that his reptilian leaders could devise, could utter such obscenities.

Since, of course, it is because to the US that the sanctions were genocidal and it is because the Americans wanted to use them as a legal means of coercion against Iraq, that they were kept around.

I refer:

"The list of those who disagreed with you and your government's handling of 13 years of sanctions and the invasion and occupation of Iraq is long, very long. It includes Unicef and other UN agencies, Care, Caritas, International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War, the then UN secretary general, Kofi Annan, and Nelson Mandela. Do not forget, either, the hundreds of thousands of people who marched in protest in Britain and across the world, among them Cambridge Against Sanctions on Iraq (CASI) and the UK Stop the War Coalition.

[...]

I was a daily witness to what you and two US administrations had concocted for Iraq: a harsh and uncompromising sanctions regime punishing the wrong people. Your officials must have told you that your policies translated into a meagre 51 US cents to finance a person's daily existence in Iraq.

You acknowledge that 60 per cent of Iraqis were totally dependent on the goods that were allowed into their country under sanctions, but you make no reference in your book to how the UK and US governments blocked and delayed huge amounts of supplies that were needed for survival. In mid-2002, more than $5bn worth of supplies was blocked from entering the country. No other country on the Iraq sanctions committee of the UN Security Council supported you in this. "

http://stopwar.org.uk/content/view/2083/2/

CH's comment is as sincere as Hitler crying about the large amounts of Jews killed in Auschwitz.

Petes said...

The alternative to sanctions that affected everyone was to take out the regime that was their real target. Surprise, surprise -- Bruno was against that too. He grudgingly admits Saddam "wasn't a nice person" ... but doesn't lose any sleep wondering about the implications.

   Lee C.  ―  U.S.A.       said...

 
If one goes back to the pre-war era news accounts, around 1989-1990, even early 1991, one can find the Evil Merkins arguing for a revision of andretargeting of the sanctions on Iraq to better target their effect on the regime and remove some of the burden they'd proven to be to the general population. people. ‘Smart Sanctions’ Colon Powell liked to call them.  (I particularly remember Powell making public arguments in favor of revisions to how the sanctions were imposed and implemented).  Iraq's apologists, notably including France, Russia and China, were less than receptive to the idea.  Saddam didn't like the idea either.

JG said...

Hi Lynnette,

Any book recommendations for Christmas?

Marcus said...

Lee, the sanctions were initially put in place on August 6, 1990 as a response to Saddams invasion of Kuwait that took place on August 2, 1990. Why would anyone discuss the severity of the impact of the sanctions on the general Iraqi population before they were put in place, before they were even concieved of?

Petes said...

I have two for you, JG ... here and here

:-)

Petes said...

Marcus, I think Lee means "1999-2000, even early 2001".

By the way, hows goes the violence in Stockholm unleashed by Sweden's attack on Afghanistan?

Maybe it'll burst that property bubble I see is still brewing.

Petes said...

[JG$]: "Any book recommendations for Christmas?"

I have two for you, JG ... here and here

:-)

   Lee C.  ―  U.S.A.       said...

Beggin’ your pardon there, Marcus; my head was mostly on the other window I had open at the time. (A point to which the glaring typos should attest.)  I's a decade off doing the math in my head while trying to do something else.  Should have read as:

      "If one goes back to the pre-war era news
      accounts, around 1999-2000, even early 2001,
      one can find the Evil Merkins arguing for a
      revision of and retargeting of the sanctions on
      Iraq to better target their effect on the regime
      and remove some of the burden they'd proven
      to be to the general population. 
‘Smart
      Sanctions’ Colon Powell liked to call
      them. 
(I particularly remember Powell
      making public arguments in favor of revisions
      to how the sanctions were imposed and
      implemented).  Saddam's usual
      apologists, notably including France, Russia
      and China, were less than receptive to the
      idea.  Saddam didn't like the idea either.

Marcus said...

"By the way, hows goes the violence in Stockholm unleashed by Sweden's attack on Afghanistan?"

It went better than it could have. First of all the bomber was the only death, when the attack could have claimed many lives if it had gone off as planned. Second we might just get a more open debate climate on the very real threat of Islamist fundamentalism in Sweden, not that I have much faith in that second part really.

"Maybe it'll burst that property bubble I see is still brewing."

That's a self imposed suicide bomb and when it blows up it won't be pretty. I won't be much affected myself, other than I fear a big portion of my future tax payments will go to covering for bank's losses.

John said...

Imagine being born while your country was under invasion and then living every year since, under occupation. I wonder how many of his extended family members were killed by the Americans?

Mucous: "I won't be much affected myself"!

I guess not. Your oil stock is looking pretty strong going into 2011. How does $100.00 a barrel sound?

And then, who knows, you might get really lucky and the US will find another unsuspecting country to invade. Nothing like a good war to drive up your portfolio, eh Mucous??

Red Avenger said...

^

Slime.

Petes said...

[Marcus]: "First of all the bomber was the only death, when the attack could have claimed many lives if it had gone off as planned."

Yeah, sounds like a bit of a miracle from what I heard -- a car bomb AND a human bomb, and in a busy shopping area. Allah must've been looking out for youze.

"I fear a big portion of my future tax payments will go to covering for bank's losses."

Don't worry, I'm sure the IMF will "bail you out" using one of their specially prepared poison chalices.

Lynnette In Minnesota said...

[JG] Any book recommendations for Christmas?

Fiction or Non-fiction? What genre?

I've just finished "Decision Points" by George W. Bush. It was interesting, but I doubt you would really want to read it. I also just finished "The White Queen" by Phillipa Gregory. History brought to life through the narration of Elizabeth Woodville. I am going to return to "The World in 2050" next, I think, for a non-fiction read. And possibly start "The Girl Who Played With Fire" for a fiction choice. I like to trade off. :)